Chirton Green

51 Chirton Green North Shields NE29 0JR
Chirton Green Chirton Green Chirton Green Chirton Green
 

All about

Q; What is Tooth Erosion?

A: Tooth erosion is the wearing away of tooth enamel by acid. The enamel is the hard calcified tissue that covers and protects the outside of the tooth. It is the hardest substance in our bodies.

The saliva in our mouth contains calcium which helps to strengthen and remineralize the teeth, however, remineralisation can not occur when a great deal of acid is present.

The high amount of acids in the food and drink that you consume can cause tooth erosion. Soft drinks and pure fruit juices contain a high amount of acid.

Tooth erosion can also be caused by medical factors such as a decrease in saliva, acid reflux disease, certain gastrointestinal conditions and the eating disorder bulimia.

 

Q : What Causes Dry Mouth?

A : While anyone get dry mouth, also called xerostomia, it is a common problem among older adults. In fact, the Oral Cancer Foundation estimates that 20% of elderly people suffer from dry mouth and this condition is also a hidden cause of tooth loss and gum disease in 30 percent of adults.

Dry mouth, which is the reduced flow of saliva, could be a symptom of a particular medical condition or a side effect of certain medications. Sufficient saliva is needed in the mouth to wash away food debris and reduce plaque by neutralizing the acids that plaque produces.

Common medications taken that may cause dry mouth are:

  • Antihistamines
  • Blood pressure medications
  • Pain pills
  • Decongestants
  • Incontinence medications
  • Antidepressants
  • Diuretics
  • Muscle relaxers
  • Parkinson’s disease medications

If you suffer from dry mouth, be sure to discuss treatment methods, such as saliva substitutes, with your dentist. Sugar-free gum and candy also can increase saliva flow.

 

Q : What is an Abscessed Tooth?

A : An abscess of the tooth is an infection. An abscess can include pus and swelling of the soft gum tissues surrounding the tooth. An abscess can develop from tooth decay or tooth trauma, such as a broken tooth. If there is an opening in the enamel of a tooth, such as a cavity, bacteria can get in and infect the pulp (centre) of the tooth and cause an abscess.

Once an abscess happens, the infection could spread throughout the mouth and body. A root canal is usually the only option to save a tooth once it has become abscessed. If you suspect that you have an abscessed tooth, you should see your dentist right away.

 

Q : What is Tooth Sensitivity?

A : Tooth sensitivity is a common problem that affects millions of people. Basically, tooth sensitivity means experiencing pain or discomfort to your teeth from sweets, cold air, hot drinks, cold drinks or ice cream. Some people with sensitive teeth even experience discomfort from brushing and flossing. The good news is that sensitive teeth can be treated.

Q : What is Calculus?

A : Calculus, also known as tartar, is the hardened residue that forms on your teeth when plaque is not removed. Plaque can be removed by brushing twice a day and flossing daily. If tartar is allowed to remain on the teeth and below the gumline, it can lead to chronic infection and inflammation. The only way to remove tartar is to have your teeth professionally cleaned at your dental practice.

 

Bad Breath

 

 

Q: How can I tell if I have bad breath?

 

A : Lots of small signals can show that you have bad breath. Have you noticed people stepping away when you start to talk? Do people turn their cheek when you kiss them goodbye? 

If you think you might have bad breath, there is a simple test that you can do. Simply lick the inside of your wrist and sniff - if the smell is bad, you can be pretty sure that your breath is too. 

Or, ask a very good friend to be absolutely honest, but do make sure they are a true friend. 


 

 

 

Q : What causes bad breath?

 

A : Bad breath is a very common problem and there are many different causes. Persistent bad breath is usually caused by the smelly gases released by the bacteria that coat your teeth and gums. Bits of food that get caught between the teeth and on the tongue will rot and can sometimes cause an unpleasant smell. So correct and regular brushing is very important to keep your breath smelling fresh. 

However,strong foods like garlic, coffee and onions can add to the problem. The bacteria on our teeth and gums (plaque) also cause gum disease and dental decay. One of the warning signs of gum disease is that you always have bad breath or a bad taste in your mouth. Again, your dentist or hygienist will be able to see and treat the problem during your regular check-ups. The earlier the problems are found, the more effective the treatment will be.

Coldsores

 

 

Q: What is a cold sore?

 

A : A cold sore is a small, painful raised area of small, fluid-filled blisters, usually where the lip joins the surrounding skin. The blisters are painful and dry up to make a yellow crust which gradually heals in a few days. Cold sores are usually found on the lips but you can get them in other places, such as in the nostrils, on the nose or around the outside of the mouth. Cold sores tend to last 5 to 7 days and can keep coming back. Most people only have them once or twice a year.

 

 

 

Q : How do I get them?

 

A : Cold sores are caused by a virus (a ‘Herpes Simplex’ virus). You first get this virus in childhood or early adulthood, and it may cause a fever and mouth ulcers (called ‘primary herpetic gingivestomatitis’). About a third of people who get this ‘primary’ infection go on to develop cold sores in later life. However, many people with cold sores did not get this primary infection.

 

 

 

Q : What brings on the cold sores?

 

A : Cold sores usually appear when people are ill with something else, for example with a cold (hence the name) or ‘flu. Sunlight and ultra-violet light can often bring on an attack of cold sores, and occasionally women find that they develop cold sores at particular stages of their menstrual cycle.

 

 

 

Q : Are they infectious?

 

A : Yes. Cold sores are infectious and the infecting virus can be passed to other people by close contact (such as kissing). A cold sore is most infectious when it is blistering. It is important to try and avoid touching cold sores as you can pass the virus on to other people’s hands and even, very rarely, to your own eyes. Avoid squeezing, pinching or pricking the cold sore as this can spread the infection.

 

 

 

Q : Can they be treated?

 

A : Yes. Antiviral creams, such as aciclovir and penciclovir, ease the pain and blistering and help the sores heal more quickly. You can buy aciclovir from a chemist, but penciclovir has to be prescribed by your doctor. Both these creams should be applied as early as possible when the cold sore starts to develop and should be applied regularly. 

 

 

 

Q : How can I avoid getting one?

 

A : Once you have had the virus it remains with you and there is little you can do to avoid an attack. How often the cold sores appear varies from person to person. However, if sunlight seems to bring on your cold sores, it is sensible to put sunblock on your lips when going out into strong sunlight.

 

 

 

Q : If I have a cold sore should I see my doctor?

 

A : Cold sores generally clear up without treatment in about a week. However, if you have a health condition that has weakened your immune system or the sores don't heal within two weeks on their own, see your doctor. If you often get attacks, your doctor may be able to prescribe an antiviral medication to treat the sores. 

 

 

 

Q : I have a cold sore but am due to see my dentist. Will they still be able to treat me?

 

A : If you have a cold sore and are due to visit your dentist or hygienist, check with them first. Some dentists prefer not to treat patients with active cold sores as the affected area may be painful, and may crack and bleed during dental treatment

 

 

 

Q : What if I’m breast-feeding?

 

A : Breast-feeding shouldn’t be stopped. However, don’t kiss your baby, especially near the mouth or eyes, while you have an active sore as this may pass the infection to your baby

 

 

 

Q : Can you only get cold sores around the mouth or can you get them on other parts of the body?

 

A : The virus that causes cold sores can also cause similar diseases on other parts of the body (for example, the fingers, eyes and genitals). It is therefore important not to touch cold sores as you may accidentally spread the virus to other parts of your body.

Q : My black fillings look so awful that I feel self-conscious when I laugh. How can I improve the appearance of my teeth?

  A : This black filling material is amalgam, and although it's a very strong and practical way to fill teeth, it can look unattractive. Ask your dentist about the possibility of replacing your amalgam fillings with another, less visible, material like porcelain or white composite.

 

 

 

 


Q : Are white fillings expensive?

A :  The cost really depends on the type of white filling you want. For white composite fillings in your back teeth, expect to pay between £40 and £70.